What ya reading?

Plot Monster

Good Morning!

I would love to know what you are reading this weekend.

It’s simple!
1. Post your current read in the comments including book name and author.

2. Like anyone’s comment if you have read the book they are reading.

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Favourite Animals Sidekicks

NoReadsTooGreat

Happy Wednesday bookworms! I am back from my unofficial hiatus, the last few weeks were so hectic with finishing my undergrad and moving out of my house that I didn’t feel I could give my blog the attention it deserves. I am happy to report I am back now and ready to get i to my usual posting schedule again. So this post is inspired by something that happened a couple months ago. My beautiful cat Lizzy passed away and I thought that in her memory I would do a post about some amazing fictional animals that are often the unsung heroes of their stories! I have included ones from books, TV shows and movies. Feel free to add some of your favourites in the comments!

1. Goose, Captain Marvel

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Goose definitely stole the movie for me. I am a pretty big cat person and there is nothing I am…

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Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Inspirational/Thought-Provoking Book Quotes

Reading Every Night

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly feature that was created by The Broke and the Bookish and hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. Born from a love of lists and a love of books each week there’s a new topic for bloggers to list their ‘top ten’.

Top Ten Tuesday '19 #12

Top Ten Inspirational/Thought-Provoking Book Quotes

When it comes to my ‘favourite’ book quotes I have a lot. Some I love because they never fail to bring a smile to my face, others because they’re cute and romantic, and others because they’ve stayed with me no matter how many other books I’ve read since. The ten I picked for this week’s Top Ten Tuesday topic are all from that last category – quotes that have meant something to me from books I haven’t been able to forget.

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Death Note | Manga vs. Movie

Bookidote

details
Title:Death Note.
Volumes: 12 + 1.
Writer(s): Tsugumi Ohba.
Illustrator(s): Takeshi Obata.
Publisher: Viz Media.

Format
:
 Tankōbon volumes & digital.
Original Run: December 1, 2003 – May 15, 2006.
Genre(s):Comics, Manga, Mystery, Supernatural, Thriller.
My Overall Rating: ★★★★☆ (3.85/5).

thoughts

Back in high school, I found myself in a deeply profound romance with the Japanese realm of manga and anime. It was one of my biggest hobbies, among other things, until I had to let go and move on to expand my interests with other sources of entertainment. During those days, I heavily praised a manga series where two masterminds would go up against each other to dish out their own platter of justice in the form that they deemed most adequate, and it is none other than the critically-acclaimed series written by Tsugumi Ohba…

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Song of Sorrow; Review

The Library Looter

🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟 / 5

Song of Sorrow by Melinda Salisbury


Goodreads | Book Depository

Song of Sorrow is the sequel to State of Sorrow, read my review of the first novel here. If you haven’t read State of Sorrow yet there may be spoilersin this synopsis and review!

Synopsis

The battle for leadership is not yet over, sinister games and dangerous plots are still at play. Sorrow is isolated from her friends and under pressure to safeguard her people against her enemies.

Sorrow – for that is all she brings.

Can Sorrow break her own curse before it destroys them all?


Song of Sorrow has a darker theme than its predecessor, I definitely noticed more violence and danger in this sequel. The stakes were much higher, mistakes or failure meant death!

I was hooked on this story from the very first page. State of Sorrow was a detailed introduction…

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Diversity Spotlight Thursday #41

YA on my Mind

Diversity Spotlight Thursday is a weekly meme hosted by Aimal @ Bookshelves and Paperbacks, and is all about highlighting diverse literature.

Diversity Spotlight takes place every Thursday, and it will be featuring three books in any given week:

  • A diverse book you have read and enjoyed
  • A diverse book that has already been released but you have not read
  • A diverse book that has not yet been released

Note: While I generally feature YA lit on my blog, occasionally I will include other age groups if necessary. Also with the exception of the books I have read, the others’ diversity is through hearsay so it may or may not be accurate or the rep may not be good.

READ

The Girl King (The Girl King, #1)The Girl King by Mimi Yu

All hail the Girl King.

Sisters Lu and Min have always understood their places as princesses of the Empire. Lu knows she is destined…

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The Weight of the Stars (soft, sweet queer girls & space) — Kayla Ancrum

howling libraries

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TITLE: The Weight of the Stars
AUTHOR: K. Ancrum
RELEASE DATE: March 19th, 2019
GENRE: Sci-fi
AGE RANGE: YA

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All Ryann wants is to travel through space, but that’s not happening for a girl living in a trailer park, taking care of her brother and his baby—so she spends her time befriending the “misfits” at her school and trying to stay out of trouble. When Alexandria shows up, she wants nothing to do with Ryann and her friends, but Ryann’s never been one to back down from a challenge, especially when that challenge is a girl known far and wide for being the only daughter of a famous astronaut who went to space and never came back.

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Old Hollywood Tell-All: The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid

The Bookworm Daydreamer

the seven husbands of evelyn hugo

Title: The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo
Author: Taylor Jenkins Reid
Rating: 5/5 Stars
Links:Goodreads | Amazon | Book Depository | B&N

Review:

It took me some time to get around to reading The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo and then it took me some time to get around to gathering my thoughts on it. What. A. Book. Reading it made me understand why everybody in the book community was so obsessed with this book. At first, I was kind of intimidated to read it because I felt like this was the kind of book I might like and I was scared I won’t. I know, it’s a silly reason not to read it. I absolutely loved this book, I adored it. I was floored by it. I don’t necessarily adore Evelyn herself as much as I admire her despite her flaws and morally ambiguous things she has done.

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IF YOU LIKE THIS BOOK YOU’LL LIKE THIS TV SHOW !

JAMISHELVES

Hello all !   Today I’m writing a post I’ve been working on for AGES – TV shows to watch if you like certain books. Or, the reverse. If you like these TV shows you’ll like these books!

I have a WHOLE bunch of ideas for this, and I keep adding more and more as I watch more shows and read more books. So for now I’ll do this as part one and if you would like to see a part two, let me know!

Obviously you can’t always find the perfect match, but these are some shows/books I think have similar elements and vibes, and that you will probably like if you enjoy the other.   lets get into it!

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Lets start with an absolute fan favourite – Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo. Most people probably know already that this follows a group of thieves who have to pull…

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Blog Tour – The Courier by Kjell Ola Dahl (translated by Don Bartlett)

bibliobeth

What’s it all about?:

The international bestselling godfather of Nordic Noir takes on one of the most horrific periods of modern history, in a stunning standalone thriller…

‘A masterclass in plotting, atmosphere and character that finely balances shocking twists’ The Times

In 1942, Jewish courier Ester is betrayed, narrowly avoiding arrest by the Gestapo. In a great haste, she escapes to Sweden, saving herself. Her family in Oslo, however, is deported to Auschwitz. In Stockholm, Ester meets the resistance hero, Gerhard Falkum, who has left his little daughter and fled both the Germans and allegations that he murdered his wife, Åse, who helped Ester get to Sweden. Their burgeoning relationship ends abruptly when Falkum dies in a fire.
And yet, twenty-five years later, Falkum shows up in Oslo. He wants to reconnect with his daughter. But where has he been, and what is the real reason for his return? Ester stumbles…

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